Early Childhood

Recently Passed Federal Public Health Legislation

Congress has passed several bills in the last few weeks related to public health.  Here’s a quick summary and links to the laws.

Improving Access to Maternity Care HR 315

This bill requires HRSA to identify maternity care health professional target areas and publish data comparing the availability of and need for maternity care health services in health professional shortage areas and areas within those areas.

Preventing Maternal Deaths Act of 2018 HR 1318

This bill authorizes HHS grants to states to review maternal deaths, publish reports with the results.

PREEMIE Reauthorization Act of 2018  S 3029

This bill increases federal research on preterm labor and delivery, improve the care, treatment, and outcomes of preterm birth and low birthweight infants. 

Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 – The Farm Bill HR 2

The Farm Bill reauthorizes food security programs through FY23 including Supplemental Assistance Program (SNAP) and SNAP nutrituon education.  It also removes hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, which would legalize hemp production and therefore changes how CBD is regulated.

State Offices of Rural Health Reauthorization Act: S 2278

This bill reauthorizes $12.5M annually through FY22 for the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy to make grants to each state office of rural health to improve health care in rural areas. This bill was approved by both the House and Senate but is not yet signed.

The Action for Dental Health Act of 2018

This bill provides an opportunity to improve oral health across the country.  The bill will provide additional resources to the CDC to increase funding for groups and organizations to qualify for federal grants that develop programs and expand access to oral health education and care in states and tribal areas

CDC will still need to flesh out the grant guidance in the coming months before they put out their announcement with the application and expectations. 

PEPFAR Extension Act of 2018  HR 6651

This bill extends certain provisions of the U.S. Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003.

Sickle Cell Disease Research, Surveillance, Prevention, and Treatment Act of 2018  S 2465

This bill reauthorizes a sickle cell disease prevention and treatment program and to authorizes funding for grants for research, surveillance, prevention, and treatment of heritable blood disorders.

Infrastructure for Alzheimer's Act S 2076

This bill would create an Alzheimer's public health infrastructure across the country to implement effective Alzheimer's interventions focused on public health issues such as increasing early detection and diagnosis, reducing risk and preventing avoidable hospitalizations.

2018 Child Fatality Review Report Published

The death of any child is a tragedy – for the family and for the community. Everybody wants to prevent childhood deaths. But making policy interventions to prevent childhood deaths requires information in order to develop effective policy interventions.  That’s where the Arizona Child Fatality Review State Team comes in.

More than 25 years ago the state legislature passed a law establishing the Arizona Child Fatality Review Program (A.R.S. § 36-342, 36-3501-4).  It’s a great example of establishing public policy designed to build data and evidence so policy makers can use evidence to build future interventions.

The State Team includes representatives from the Academy of Pediatrics and from the ADES Divisions of Developmental Disabilities and Children and Family Services, as well as from law enforcement and the ADHS. The team’s role is to review all childhood deaths in AZ and produce an annual report to the Governor and legislature with a summary of findings and recommendations based on promising and proven strategies regarding the prevention of child deaths.

In past years this focus has raised the awareness about child drowning and the importance of putting babies to sleep on their backs or making sure all children are always secured in car seats. Other recommendations included taking action to reduce the number of uninsured, decrease medical complications of pregnancy and increase safe sleep practices.

The 2018 Child Fatality Review Report was published last week- and as usual it provides a host of data and recommendations that are directly tied to evidence. Here are some examples from this year’s report.

Child suicides increased an astonishing 32% and accounted for 6% percent of all child deaths. A history of family discord was the most commonly identified preventable factor in suicides followed closely by a history of recent break-up, drug/alcohol use and an argument with a parent. 

Firearm deaths increased 19% from the previous report.  Suicides and homicides accounted for 88% of firearm-related deaths in 2017. Fifty-one percent of firearm related deaths were a result of suicide (n=22) and 37% of firearm related deaths were homicides (n=16).

Injury deaths increased 4% from the previous reporting period and comprised 23% of all child deaths. The leading cause was car crashes and 31% of the injury deaths were among kids less than 1 year old… and important piece of data considering Arizona has yet to adopt a law requiring kids under 2 years old to be in a rear facing car seat.

The number of unsafe sleep deaths increased 5% from the previous year.  60% were bed sharing with adults and/or other children. Child fatalities due to maltreatment decreased 4% and accounted for 10% of all child deaths in Arizona.   Substance use was a factor in 65% of maltreatment deaths.

Drowning deaths increased 30% over the period and accounted for 4% of all child deaths. 63% occurred in a pool or hot tub. Lack of supervision was a factor in 69% of drowning deaths.

Substance use was a factor in 17% of all child fatalities (n=136).  The majority of substance use related deaths involved the child or the child’s parent as the main user contributing to the death of the child. In 49% of substance use related deaths, the parent was misusing or abusing alcohol or drugs.

The full report covers each of these areas including some recommendations for policy and program interventions in each area.  Sometimes the recommendations are more related to increasing awareness but many are more policy based.

Lots of work went into this report- so if you're somebody in a position to influence either lawmakers or agency officials to implement preventative policies in these areas- please get familiar with this   important research product - it will really help inform your advocacy efforts.

CHW Rulemaking, Opioid Epidemic Ends and Various CEU Opportunities

Community Health Worker Certification Rulemaking

The new law that authorizes the voluntary certification of community health workers will officially take effect on August 3 (HB 2324 Voluntary Certification for Community Health Workers). Voluntary certification can’t begin until the ADHS completes their Administrative Rulemaking (regulations) that’ll flesh out the details of the certification program including defining the core competencies, the criteria for establishing those competencies, continuing education requirements, the fee and other certification details. 

The first step in the Rulemaking process is for the ADHS to populate the 9 member advisory council to help inform the Rulemaking (the ADHS Director makes those appointments based on the criteria in the Session Law - the language at the end of the bill here).  After that, the agency needs to open the docket for the rulemaking and put draft rules out for public comment in what’s called the Arizona Administrative Register.

The public will then have a chance to comment on those initial draft regulations.  The ADHS will then consider those comments and file the final proposed rules with the AZ Secretary of State (here’s a summary of the rulemaking process on the SOS website).

Before the rules become effective- the agency needs to get final approval of the regulations by the Governor's Regulatory Review Council (GRRC).  If GRRC approves the rules- they’d become effective and voluntary certification could begin.

Realistically- even if the ADHS starts right away and appoints the advisory council and they begin meeting this Summer and began writing the initial draft rules later this year, it could easily take a couple of years before they’d become effective- so it's important to begin the process soon with initial advisory council meetings. 

You might be familiar with other agency rulemaking that have gone a lot faster than this.  That’s likely because those were probably “exempt” rulemakings, which provides several rulemaking short cuts including an exemption from the GRRC requirements.  Sadly, the CHW Rulemaking isn’t “exempt”.

The Rulemaking will be among the topics we’ll all be talking about at the AZCHOW Conference on June 21st and 22nd in Tucson.  Hopefully many of you will be able to make it.  AzPHA will be exhibiting at the conference.

 

Opioid Public Health Emergency Executive Order Ends

This week the Governor officially ended the emergency public health declaration that was signed via an Executive Order about a year ago.  Much has been accomplished over the last year including implementing legislation that improves prescribing practices and enhances emergency responses and increases access to treatment.  Of course- the work will go on.  The epidemic didn’t start overnight, and it surely won’t end overnight.  You can read the official end of the emergency declaration here.

Rep. McSally (R) is hosting a House of Representatives Border and Maritime Subcommittee hearing today (May 30) at 9:30 am at the UA College of Medicine Phoenix (Building 2) entitled: “An Unsecure Border and the Opioid Crisis: The Urgent Need for Action to Save Lives” featuring the Governor, various federal officials from the DEA, CBP, and DHS as well as Dr. Christ, Debbie Moak, and some people from faith-based organizations. You can see the panel line up here.  It looks like it’s an open meeting.

 

Aligning Health and Early Childhood Learning

Evidence shows how important early childhood education is in protecting people from disease and disability as an adult-  and that a child’s health impacts his or her ability to learn and succeed in school and later in life. Even with these known positive connections between early learning and wellness- health and education systems sometimes fail to align and provide opportunities to maximize health and early learning outcomes for children.

To address the disconnect between health and education, the HHS & US Department of Education outlined a set of recommendations for states and communities to align health and early learning systems. The recommendations emphasize the need for a comprehensive, seamless, and coordinated set of systems to support children, parents, and families.

 

Legislative Session Webinar Posted

The UA has posted my webinar from a couple of weeks ago that summarizes the legislative session from a public health perspective.  The whole thing is about an hour long.  You can check out the webinar on the UA Telemedicine Website.  Here’s the PowerPoint that I used.

 

CDC’s Learning Connection

The CDC has what they call a “Learning Connection” which connects public health professionals, including healthcare workers, to training opportunities and educational tools developed by CDC. Their Learning Connection also engages public health professionals around the world via social media messaging and a monthly e-newsletter.

The CDC Learning Connection: 1) features quality learning opportunities from CDC, other federal agencies, and federally funded partners; 2) keeps you up-to-date on the latest training through a free monthly e-newsletter; 3) offers access to thousands of training opportunities through CDC TRAIN — CDC’s online learning system; 4) connects you to information about CDC internships and fellowships; and 5) makes it easy to locate courses that offer continuing education. There are literally hundreds of courses one can take- mostly on-line and self-paced.

 

Free Continuing Education from MMWR and Medscape:

CDC MMWR and Medscape introduced a new FREE continuing education (CE) activity that describe trends and demographic differences in health outcomes and healthcare use for childhood asthma, based on a CDC analysis of asthma data from the 2001-2016 National Health Interview Survey for children 17 years and younger.

This activity is intended for pediatricians, pulmonologists, public health officials, nurses, and other clinicians caring for patients with childhood asthma. To access this FREE MMWR / Medscape CE activity visit https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/cme/medscape_cme.html. If you’re not a registered user on Medscape, you may register for free or login without a password and get unlimited access to all continuing education activities and other Medscape features.

 

Free Continuing Education Training for Opioid Prescribers offered by UA

With the requirement of Arizona prescribers to complete 3 hours of opioid, substance use disorder, or addiction-related CME, the University if Arizona’s Center for Rural Health we offer Arizona based materials and continuing education opportunities including:

Free online CME vouchers worth $150: order vouchers by responding to this email. We can mail them to you in batches of 100 to 500. Please feel free to forward the listserv blast below and attached documents for your attendees.

Free Arizona Opioid Prescribing Guidelines printed copies: order at http://www.azdhs.gov/audiences/clinicians/index.php#clinical-guidelines-and-rx-guidelines-order

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I’m doing my best to populate the “upcoming events” part of our AzPHA website.  If you have an upcoming public health related event- please let me know and I’ll get it up on our website at: http://www.azpha.org/upcoming-events/

 

Dr. Bob’s Travelogue

I’ve gotten a couple more Travelogues from Dr. Bob in the last couple of weeks.  He’s been living for the last couple of months just outside of London. He's writing some entertaining travelogues- with a splash of public health of course. Take a few minutes when you're on a comfortable couch and enjoy Travelogue 1 & 2: Getting Settled and Travelogue 3: Nutrition. Here’s Interlude from last week and this new one Hoof Beats.