Physical Activity

It’s Switchover Time at the Legislature

The week before last was the deadline for bills to be heard in their chamber of origin- and much of last week’s action was on floor votes (called Third Read).  When a bill clears the House or Senate (having a 3rd reading with a recorded vote of the body) it’s transmitted to the other body of the legislature (the switchover). At that point, it gets 1st and 2nd read and assigned to a committee (s). Then it’s up to the chair to schedule the bill.

If heard, then it gets voted on and gets thru that body. If there are no changes, it’s sent back to its original body who then transmits it to the Governor. If there are changes the bill, goes back to the originating body to decide if they accept the changes. If they do, they’ll be a final read and recorded vote before transmitting to the Governor. If they don’t agree then it goes to conference committee. It can be a “simple” conference where the choice is the House or the Senate version. Most are free conference committees in which there are 3 members per body who serve.

Conference committees usually don’t take testimony.  The meetings are open but there’s usually only announcements from the floor to know when the group meets.  If there’s finally agreement, it goes back for acceptance of the conference report and a final vote by each side before it goes to the Governor.

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Lots of action last week with lots of 3rd read floor votes in the Senate. The House isn’t as far along in finishing 3rd reads.  This week we'll mostly be watching the 3rd Read votes.  We'd really like to get the hand free cell use bill, the syringe services bill, the GME bill and the e-cigarette smoke free AZ act bill through their chambers this week. Here's our document with all the particulars on bills this week.

Public health can breathe a little sigh of relief now that the Governor made it clear that he doesn’t   intend to sign any bill that would lower vaccination rates. We're already gambling with the lives of infants, people with disabilities, and immune optimized folks because of the erosion in our immunization rates and any of the 3 anti-vaccine bills this year (HB 2470, HB 2471, or HB  2472 would have done just that. 

We need public health policy decisions that improve vaccination rates, not decisions that put vulnerable people at even more risk.  With the Governor’s statements this we can now focus more of our efforts on the other (mostly good) public health policy bills out there.

 

Bills that Passed through the House or Senate

Access to Care & Healthcare Workforce

SB 1088 Dental Care During Pregnancy (Carter) – AzPHA Position: YES

Passed the Senate 27-3.  This bill would expand AHCCCS covered services to include comprehensive dental coverage during pregnancy and appropriate the required state match funding. Good oral health is well established to improve birth outcomes including reducing pre-term birth while also preventing the transmission of caries from mom to infant after birth.  This priority bill was passed by the Senate this week and has been transferred to the House. Note that since this bull would have a needed appropriation it will need to be included in the final state budget.

SB 1089Telemedicine Insurance Coverage (Carter) – AzPHA Position: Yes

This Bill would put into law specific standards requiring non-Medicaid insurance companies to cover telemedicine.  There are criteria and standards in the law regarding contracting standards. Requires that coverage for telemedicine healthcare services if the service is covered when delivered in-person.   This bill would be good for access to care especially in rural Arizona which is why we’re supporting it. Passed 30-0.

SB 1174 Tribal Area Health Education Center

Health Education System consists of five area health education centers each representing a geographic area with specified populations that currently lack services by the health care professions.  The current regional centers include: 1) Eastern Arizona AHEC; 2) Greater Valley AHEC; 3) Northern Arizona AHEC; 4) Southeast Arizona AHEC; and 5) Western Arizona AHEC/Regional Center for Border Health.  This bill adds an area health education center that would focus on tribal areas and the Indian health care delivery system. Passed 30-0.  

SB 1355 Native American Dental Care

Passed Senate 25-5.  Requires AHCCCS to seek federal authorization to reimburse the Indian health services and tribal facilities to cover the cost of adult dental services.

** Kids Care: The Kids Care Reauthorization bills have all languished in their chamber of origin, however, we have good reason to believe that reauthorizing Kids Care including the appropriation needed to pay the state match (10%) will be negotiation in the state budget bills.

 

Licensing & Vital Records

SB 1247 Residential Care Institutions (Brophy McGee) AzPHA Position: Yes

Passed the Senate 30-0. This good bill will require more robust staffing background checks for facilities that provide services for children and will remove the “deemed status” designation for child residential behavioral health facilities.  Under current law, facilities in this category (e.g. Southwest Key) can be accredited by a third party (e.g. Council on Accreditation) and avoid annual surprise inspections by the ADHS.  This intervention will provide more oversight to ensure background checks are done and that the facilities are compliant with state regulations. 

 

SB 1211 Intermediate Care Facilities (Carter) AzPHA Position: Yes

Passed the Senate 30-0. Like SB 1247, this bill closes a licensing loophole.  This good bill will require more robust staffing background checks for facilities that provide services to people with disabilities at intermediate care facilities.  These facilities would also require a license to operate from the Arizona Department of Health Services beginning on January 1, 2020.  Under current law these facilities (Hacienda de los Angeles and similar facilities run by the ADES are exempt from state licensing requirements)

 

SB 1245 Vital Records- Death Certificates (Brophy McGee) AzPHA Position: Yes

This bill will make it clear that both state and county Registrars can provide certified copies of death certificates to licensed funeral home directors upon request.  There’s been some confusion about this authority and this bill would clear it up.   Passed the Senate 30-0.

Tobacco & Nicotine

SB 1009 Electronic Cigarettes, Tobacco Sales (Carter) – AzPHA Position: YES

Expands the definition of tobacco products to include e-cigarettes. Among other things, it'll make it clear that it's illegal to sell e-cigarettes to minors. The penalty for selling to minors remains at $5K. Passed the Senate 30-0.

Surveillance & Social Determinants

HB 2125 Child Care Subsidies (Udall) – AzPHA Position: YES

Passed House 46-13.  Makes a supplemental appropriation of $56 million from the Federal Child Care and Development Fund block grant in FY2018-19 to the Department of Economic Security for child care assistance. Another bill, HB 2124 would allocate the money as follows: $26.7 million for provider rate increases, $14 million to serve children on the waiting list, and $13.1 million to increase tiered reimbursement for infants, toddlers and children in the care of DCS. HB 2436 is a similar bill. Passed 46-13 and has moved over to the Senate.

HB 2488 Veteran Suicide Annual Report (Lawrence) AzPHA Position: Yes

Requires ADHS to annually compile a report on veteran suicides beginning January 1, 2020. The data in the report would be shared across the public health system and with the VA and will hopefully include surveillance results that are actionable to prevent veteran suicides.

SB 1040 Maternal Mortality Report (Brophy-McGee) – AzPHA Position: YES

This bill would require the Child Fatality Review Team subcommittee on maternal mortality to make recommendations on improving information collection. Passed the Senate 30-0.

Bills that Still Need to Have a Final (3rd Read) First Chamber Vote

SB 1165 Texting and Driving Prohibition (Brophy McGee) – AzPHA Position: YES

This bill prohibits using a hand-held cell phone while driving.  There are some common-sense exemptions for example if the person is using it hands free etc.  Violations are a civil $ penalty (no driving points) with the first offense being between $75- $150 and the 2nd offense between $150 and $250.  The bill would provide a state overlay so the cell phone use laws would no longer be different from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. We’re signed up in support of this bill.  This bill still needs to go to Committee of the Whole and get a Senate 3rd read.

HB 2718 Syringe Services Programs (Rivero) AzPHA Position: Yes

Decriminalizes syringe access programs, currently a class 6 felony. To qualify, programs need to list their services including disposal of used needles and hypodermic syringes, injection supplies at no cost, and access to kits that contain an opioid antagonist or referrals to programs that provide access to an opioid antagonist.  Approved by the International Affairs Study Committee this week.  Did not receive a hearing in Rules yet, we’ll work with stakeholders to get it heard in Rules.

SB 1354 Graduate Medical Information & Student Loan Repayment (Carter) AzPHA Position: Yes

This bill appropriates $50M from the General Fund to AHCCCS, UA Health Science Center, ADHS and the to address the state-wide shortage of physicians and nurses.  The bill has several elements with a rural focus. Elements include $20M for Graduate Medical Education in critical-access hospitals and community health centers in rural areas and $4M for the ADHS’ health practitioners loan repayment system. Many elements will be very good for access to care in rural AZ.  Bill still needs a final vote in the Senate and of course – since it’s a money bill it’ll need to go through the budget process.

SB 1060 (Strike-all Amendment) Electronic Cigarettes. Smoke Free Arizona Act (Carter) – AzPHA Position: YES

Includes e-cigarettes in the definition of tobacco products and smoking for the purposes of the Smoke Free Arizona Act.  Allows smoking in retail stores that sell electronic smoking devices exclusively and have an independent ventilation system.  Because the Act was voter approved- this modification to the law will require a 3/4 majority of both houses.  This bill still needs to go to Committee of the Whole and get a Senate 3rd read.

SB 1456 Vision Screening- AzPHA Position: Yes

This bill would require schools to provide vision screening services to students in grades prescribed by future ADHS rules, kids being considered for special education services, and students who are not reading at grade level by the third grade. Appropriates $100,000 from the state General Fund to the ADHS for the tracking and follow up.  This bill still needs to go to Committee of the Whole and get a Senate 3rd read.

HB 2471 Informed Consent (Barto) - AzPHA Position: Opposed

This bill would add a requirement that physicians provide to parents and guardians the full vaccine package insert and excipient summary for each vaccine that will be administered.  Physicians already provide a Vaccine Information Summary to parents and guardians for each vaccine administered, which is noted in the medical record.  This new requirement would mandate provision of the 12-15 page insert, which is not presented in a format that incorporates health literacy principles.  Bill is likely dead but we’re remaining vigilant and will work with Stakeholders like TAPI to hold it back in the House.

HB  2472 Vaccinations- Antibody Titer (Barto) - AzPHA Position: Opposed

These bills would mandate that doctors inform parents and guardians that antibody titer tests (which involve a venous draw) are an option in lieu of receiving a vaccination and that there are exemptions available for the state requirements for attending school.   Bill is likely dead but we’re remaining vigilant and will work with Stakeholders like TAPI to hold it back in the House.

HB 2470 Vaccination Religious Exemptions (Barto) - AzPHA Position: Opposed

This bill would add an additional exemption to the school vaccine requirements into state law.  Currently there are medical and personal exemptions.  The bill doesn't include any verification of the religious exemption from a religious leader, just a declaration from the parent that they are opposed to vaccines on religious grounds.  Bill is likely dead but we’re remaining vigilant and will work with Stakeholders like TAPI to hold it back in the House.

Good Bills that are Effectively Dead

Unless a miracle happens- this is the last time you’ll see me mention the bills below in my policy updates

SB 1363  Tobacco Product Sales (Tobacco 21) (Carter)

HB 2162  Vaccine Personal Exemptions (Hernandez)

HB 2352 School Nurse and Immunization Postings (Butler)

HB 2172  Rear Facing Car Seats (Bolding)

HB 2246  Motorcycle Helmets (Friese)

SB 1219  Domestic Violence Offenses & Firearm Transfer

HB 2247  Bump Stocks (Friese)

HB 2248  Firearm Sales (Friese)

HB 2161  Order of Protection (Hernandez)

SB 1119 Tanning Studios (Mendez)

HB 2347  Medicaid Buy-in (Butler)

HB 2351  Medical Services Study Committee (Butler)

Legislative Update

All the legislative committees have big long agendas this week – as the deadline for bills to be head in their house of origin committees is rapidly approaching.  So, this will be a busy week. 

Our policy interns Tim Giblin and Annissa Biggane have been doing a great job tracking all the bills that we’re signed up for and against and monitoring amendments and the like. Here’s their detailed summary of all the various public health related bills and where they are in the system right now.

We have an Action Alert this week regarding some bills that will have a detrimental effect on vaccination rates- so please follow through on that this week- you can see more about that below.

Bills to Be Heard in Committee This Week

Monday

HB 2597  School Safety Plan Task Force (Hernandez) AzPHA Position: Yes

This well-researched bill came out of a workgroup established by students at Mountain View High School. It takes a proactive approach to prevent school violence.  The Bill asks schools to develop plans to outline how teachers and staff will respond to crisis situations, how they respond to warning signs of emotional or behavioral distress among students, partnerships with agencies to refer students to support services, and what services they’ll provide after a violent incident. This important bill will be heard in the House Education Committee on Monday, February 18 at 2pm.  We’re signed up in favor of the bill.

 

Tuesday

SB1399  School Health Pilot Program (Pace) AzPHA Position: Yes

This bill charges the AZ Department of Education with conducting a 3-year physical and health education professional development pilot program to improve the ability of physical and health educators in this state to provide high quality physical and health education to students in this state, improving student health and reducing Arizona health care cost containment 10 system and other health-related costs.  Appropriates $9.5M for planning, implementing, and evaluating the pilot.  This important bill will be heard in the Senate Education Committee on Tuesday, February 18 at 2pm. We’re signed up in favor of the bill and I’ll be speaking in Committee.

 

Wednesday

SB 1165 Texting and Driving Prohibition (Brophy McGee) – AzPHA Position: YES

This bill prohibits using a hand-held cell phone while driving.  There are some common-sense exemptions for example if the person is using it hands free etc.  Penalties are a civil penalty (no driving points) with the first offense being between $75- $150 and the 2nd offense between $150 and $250.  We are signed up in support of this bill.  Will be heard in Senate Transportation Wednesday at 9 am.  We’re signed up in favor of the bill and I’ll be speaking in Committee.

 

Thursday

HB 2471 Informed Consent (Barto) - AzPHA Position: Opposed

This bill would add a requirement that physicians provide to parents and guardians the full vaccine package insert and excipient summary for each vaccine that will be administered.  Physicians already provide a Vaccine Information Summary to parents and guardians for each vaccine administered, which is noted in the medical record.

This new requirement would mandate provision of the 12-15 page insert, which is not presented in a format that incorporates health literacy principles. Hearing will be Thursday, February 21 at 9 am in the House of Representatives Health and Human Services Committee.  We’re signed up opposed to the the bill and I’ll be speaking in Committee.

 

HB  2472 Vaccinations- Antibody Titer (Barto) - AzPHA Position: Opposed

These bills would mandate that doctors inform parents and guardians that antibody titer tests (which involve a venous draw) are an option in lieu of receiving a vaccination and that there are exemptions available for the state requirements for attending school.   Hearing will be Thursday, February 21 at 9 am in the House of Representatives Health and Human Services Committee.  Hearing will be Thursday, February 21 at 9 am in the House of Representatives Health and Human Services Committee.  We’re signed up opposed to the bill and I’ll be speaking in Committee.

HB 2470 Vaccination Religious Exemptions (Barto) - AzPHA Position: Opposed

This bill would add an additional exemption to the school vaccine requirements into state law.  Currently there are medical and personal exemptions.  The bill doesn't include any verification of the religious exemption from a religious leader, just a declaration from the parent that they are opposed to vaccines on religious grounds.  Hearing will be Thursday, February 21 at 9 am in the House of Representatives Health and Human Services Committee.  We’re signed up opposed to the bill and I’ll be speaking in Committee.

ACTION ALERT: Please contact the following Representatives and let them know that you oppose HB 2470, HB 2471 & 2472 as they will decrease immunization coverage and jeopardize herd immunity.

Please focus your attention on the lawmakers in bold- especially those of you that know them!

 

John Allen

jallen@azleg.gov

Nancy Barto

nbarto@azleg.gov

Kelli Butler

kbutler@azleg.gov

Gail Griffin

ggriffin@azleg.gov

Alma Hernandez

ahernandez@azleg.gov

Jay Lawrence

jlawrence@azleg.gov  

Becky A. Nutt

bnutt@azleg.gov

Pamela Powers Hannley

ppowershannley@azleg.gov

Amish Shah

ashah@azleg.gov


Bills Heard in Committee Last Week

SB 1247 Residential Care Institutions (Brophy McGee) AzPHA Position: Yes

This good bill will require more robust staffing background checks for facilities that provide services for children and will remove the “deemed status” designation for child residential behavioral health facilities.  Under current law, facilities in this category (e.g. Southwest Key) can be accredited by a third party (e.g. Council on Accreditation) and avoid annual surprise inspections by the ADHS.

This intervention will provide more oversight to ensure background checks are done and that the facilities are compliant with state regulations.  This bill passed through the Senate Health & Human Services this week and will be moving to the floor.

SB 1211 Intermediate Care Facilities (Carter) AzPHA Position: Yes

Like SB 1247, this bill closes a licensing loophole.  This good bill will require more robust staffing background checks for facilities that provide services to people with disabilities at intermediate care facilities.  These facilities would also require a license to operate from the Arizona Department of Health Services beginning on January 1, 2020. 

Under current law these facilities (Hacienda de los Angeles and similar facilities run by the ADES are exempt from state licensing requirements This Bill passed the Senate Health & Human Services this week and will be moving to the floor.

 

SB 1088 Dental Care During Pregnancy (Carter) AzPHA Position: Yes

This bill would expand AHCCCS covered services to include comprehensive dental coverage during pregnancy and appropriate the required state match funding. Passed the Senate Health & Human Services Committee on 1/23.  This Bill passed through the Senate Appropriation Committee this week and will be headed to the floor next.

 

HB 2073 Vapor Products; Regulation (Shope) – AzPHA Position: Opposed

This bill would basically set up a quasi-regulatory program at the ADHS to license electronic cigarette manufacturers in Arizona and specify that only licensed electronic cigarette manufacturers can sell products in Arizona.  It gives no regulatory authority to the ADHS to enforce that vape shops get licensed and they only must do it every 5 years. There are no penalties for noncompliance and penalties are against the purchaser instead of the retailer.  This bill passed the House Health Committee by a 5-4 vote this week.

 

Bills that Have Passed a Chamber

SB 1009 Electronic Cigarettes, Tobacco Sales (Carter) – AzPHA Position: YES

Expands the definition of tobacco products to include e-cigarettes. Among other things, it'll make it clear that it's illegal to sell e-cigarettes to minors. The penalty for selling to minors remains at $5K. Unanimously passed in the full Senate and was transmitted to the House this week.

SB 1040 Maternal Mortality Report (Brophy-McGee) – AzPHA Position: YES

This bill would require the Child Fatality Review Team subcommittee on maternal mortality to compile an annual statistical report on the incidence and causes of "severe maternal morbidity" with recommendations for action.  The current law requires a review of the data but no report.

New Physical Activity Guidelines

It’s no secret that obesity is a core public health challenge of our time- largely as a result of the lack of physical activity and poor nutrition.  In fact, 80% of US adults and adolescents aren’t getting enough physical activity.  Physical activity fosters normal growth and development and can make people feel, function, and sleep better and reduce risk of many chronic diseases.

A couple of weeks ago JAMA’s 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee published a systematic review of the science supporting physical activity and health in HHS’ 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Scientific Report.  The HHS Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Report (2nd edition) recommended the following:

  • Preschool-aged children (3 through 5 years) should be physically active throughout the day to enhance growth and development.

  • Children and adolescents aged 6 through 17 should do 60 minutes or more of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily.

  • Adults should do at least 150 minutes to 300 minutes a week of moderate-intensity, or 75 minutes to 150 minutes a week of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. They should also do muscle-strengthening activities 2 days a week.

  • Pregnant and postpartum women should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week.

The 2018 recommendations emphasize that moving more and sitting less will benefit nearly everyone. Individuals performing the least physical activity benefit most by even modest increases in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Additional benefits occur with more physical activity. Both aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activity are beneficial.

The JAMA Committee concluded that the  Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans Report (2nd edition)   provides information and guidance on the types and amounts of physical activity that provide substantial health benefits. Health professionals and policy makers should facilitate awareness of the guidelines and promote the health benefits of physical activity and support efforts to implement programs, practices, and policies to facilitate increased physical activity and to improve the health of the US population. 

You can dive into the systematic review on the JAMA site. Their review largely validates the 2018 guidelines.

Tucson Voters Lead the Way

Last week Tucson voters approved Proposition 407 approving $225M in Bonds for improving the outdoor built environment.  The funds will be used over the coming years for playgrounds, sports fields, pools, splash pads, recreation centers, pedestrian pathways, bike pathways, and pedestrian & bike safety infrastructure. 

The plan includes 25 new splash pads, 22 new playgrounds and 17 shade structures installed at city parks in the next several years.  Tucson will be reopening 2 city pools that have been closed and will make renovations the 22 other public pools.  Improvements are also planned for sports fields, 28 new walking paths in parks, 26 new ramadas, 19 new restrooms and an amphitheater.

Safety and mobility projects will connect people to parks, schools, shopping and transportation. New sidewalks, enhanced major street crossings, off-street biking and walking paths and residential street traffic calming are also slated in the plan which will provide more than 210 km of enhancements across Tucson.

The improvements won’t happen overnight though.  The $225M in improvements is spread over 9 years.  You can learn more about the proposed Parks and Connections projects using Tucson’s Interactive Story Map.

Congrats to the voters of Tucson for investing in their built environment and creating more opportunities for folks to enjoy the outdoors and get some exercise!

More States Implementing School-based Nutrition & Physical Activity Policies

Obesity remains a complex health issue in the United States. Several factors—including behavioral, environmental, and genetic—interact and contribute to increasing obesity rates. Approximately 19% of children and adolescents aged 2-19 years old are obese and face a greater risk of developing chronic and other conditions like diabetes, heart disease, cancer, high blood pressure, asthma, and sleep apnea. By 2012, the estimated annual cost of obesity in the United States was $147 billion, in addition to other social and emotional costs.

The causes of childhood obesity include unavailability of healthy food options, easy access to unhealthy foods, lack of physical activity, as well as policy and environmental factors that do not support healthy lifestyles. Schools play a significant role in diet and activity through the foods and drinks offered and the opportunities for physical activity provided.

Recognizing the unique position of schools, states have enacted and proposed legislation to prevent and reduce childhood obesity by: (1) ensuring that nutritious food and beverages are available at schools, and (2) establishing physical activity and education standards at schools. Below is an overview of current laws and recent state and territorial legislative activities to increase the availability of healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in schools.

School Nutrition Legislation

Children and adolescents consume much of the food they need each day while at school. Children may receive meals from federal programs like the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program, or they may purchase competitive food and drinks (i.e., food that’s purchased from school-based vending machines, snack bars, or concessions outside of the school’s food service program). Many states have adopted policies to make competitive foods healthier, set limits on food for rewards, and impose restrictions on food and beverage marketing in schools.

A Colorado statute prohibits public schools from making available any food or beverage that contains any amount of industrially produced trans-fat on school grounds. In Kentucky, each school must limit access to retail fast foods in cafeterias to no more than one day each week. Laws in New Jersey prohibit the sale of foods of minimal nutritional value, all food and beverage items listing sugar as the first ingredient, and all forms of candy on school property during the school day.

In 2017, California’s governor approved a bill limiting the advertisement of food and beverages during the school day in schools, school districts, or charter schools participating in federal lunch and breakfast programs. California also prohibited participation in corporate incentive programs that reward children with food and beverages that do not comply with nutrition standards. New Hampshire proposed similar legislation prohibiting the advertisement of any food or beverage that does not meet the minimum nutrition standards as set forth by the school district, as well as participation in a corporate incentive program that rewards children with food and beverages.

Recognizing that many schools lack the necessary equipment to support the storage, preparation, and service of minimally processed and whole foods, the Washington State legislature introduced a bill that would establish a competitive equipment assistance grant program for public schools to improve the quality of food service meals that meet federal dietary guidelines and increase the consumption of whole foods. In 2017, Puerto Rico proposed a bill requiring that vending machines located in public schools only contain products of high nutritional value according to the standards imposed by the federal government.

Physical Activity Legislation

According to CDC, children and adolescents should have one hour or more of physical activity every day. State policymakers often target physical activity and education curriculums in K-12 schools to combat the childhood obesity epidemic. Promising trends include: improving physical education curricula, integrating physical activity into the school day and maximizing recess opportunities, as well as enhancing physical activity opportunities in school-based after-school programs.

Many states have statutes in place or have proposed legislation imposing physical activity and education requirements in schools. Last legislative session, Arizona approved a new law mandating that public schools include recess in their curriculum. Other states have gone further. 

Iowa, Louisiana, North Carolina, and Texas require 30 minutes of physical activity each school day. Arkansas requires 90 minutes of physical activity each week for grades K-6. South Carolina sets a minimum standard of 150 minutes per week for grades K-5. Colorado requires 600 minutes of physical activity each month for full-time elementary students.  Tennessee amended its statute to require a minimum of 130 minutes of physical activity per full school week for elementary school students and a minimum of 90 minutes for middle and high school students.

New AZ Public Health Laws Take Effect Friday

State legislators passed several new laws that will influence public health last session- but almost all of them won’t take effect until Friday (August 3). The Legislature has developed a report that report that summarizes all of this year’s bills. The health-related bills are on pages 99-108.  Here’s a snapshot:

  • HB 2088 will require school districts to: 1) develop intervention strategies to prevent heat-related illnesses, sudden cardiac death, and prescription opioid use; 2) notify parents when kids are bullied; and 3) tell parents if a student is suspected of having a concussion.  An ADHS concussion training & management report is due at the end of 2018.

  • HB 2196 will limit ambulance certificate of necessity (CON) hearings to 10 days unless the Administrative Law Judge determines that there’s an extraordinary need for more hearing days.  Hearings had previously gone on for many weeks or even months.

  • HB 2197 requires AZ health licensing boards to collect certain data from applicants (beginning January 2020).

  • HB 2228 directs AHCCCS to exempt tribal members from work requirement waiver requests (more on this later in the update).

  • HB2235 will set up a new licensed class of dental professionals called a Dental Therapist.  The next step is for the AZ Board of Dental Examiners to develop the scope of practice and license regulations.

  • HB 2323 authorizes contracted nurses to provide emergency inhaler medication in case of respiratory emergencies (takes effect this semester).

  • HB 2324 charges the ADHS with implementing a voluntary certification for Community Health Workers. The next steps are for the ADHS to establish the advisory committee and begin the Rulemaking to set up the certification process.

  • HB2371 sets up statewide licensure for food trucks. The licenses will have reciprocity in all county health and environmental service departments.

  • SB 1083 will require public schools (K-3) to have at least 2 recess periods beginning this semester.   Grades 4 and 5 will be required to have 2 recess periods beginning August 2019.

  • SB 1245 will develop a produce incentive program within the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program within ADES.

  • SB 1389 requires the ADHS to develop an HIV Action Plan.

  • SB 1465 requires the ADHS to adopt rules and license sober living homes.  It also allows them to contract with a third party to assist with licensure and inspections. They have a 2-year exemption from the regular rulemaking process.

  • Note: SB 1001 - The Arizona Opioid Epidemic Act was in a Special Session and became law several months ago. 

AzPHA Public Health Policy Update- December 13, 2017

More Evidence that Physical Activity Improves Grades

It’s no secret that physically active kids are healthier, but a state study released Wednesday found that they also do better on reading and writing, and even school attendance.

Fourteen schools in central and northern Minnesota each received $10,000 to implement three-year physical activity programs under a study conducted by the state’s departments of Health and Education.

Most schools went beyond merely beefing up the traditional physical education class. Instead, they incorporated physical activity throughout the day — before and after school as well as movement within the classroom.

Researchers found that students who were physically fit were much more likely to score better on state standardized tests. They were 27% more likely to be proficient in math and 24% more likely to be proficient in reading.

Each school chose its own set of activities. For example, one school took  two 10-minute breaks each day to move around, sometimes using internet programs such as GoNoodle. They also had before- and after-school activities such as running, yoga, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing.

 

Minnesota Adopting Physical Activity Standards for Schools

Legislation passed in 2016 requires the Minnesota Department of Education to adopt the national physical education standards and “modify them according to state interest.” 

Using the SHAPE America National Standards as a base, they are in the process of making changes to the national standards address state statutory requirements and best practices in physical education. 

The new standards will replace the state’s current standards, the National Standards for Physical Education, which were developed by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education, adopted by Minnesota in 2010, and implemented in all schools in the 2012-2013 school year. 

Here are their current Physical Education Standards Draft Rules 

 

E-cigs quadruple probability of smoking tobacco
A newly published study found that young adults using electronic cigarettes quadruple their chance of smoking tobacco within 18 months. 

The study, published in the American Journal of Medicine monitored young adults aged between 18 to 30 years - who had never smoked conventional cigarettes for a year.  Of the participants who said they vaped e-cigarettes in the first questionnaire, 47% had started smoking cigarettes 18 months later compared to 11% percent of those who didn’t use e-cigarettes.

 

Arizona WIC Implements Electronic Benefit Transfer

Arizona’s Women, Infant, and Children implemented an electronic benefits system last week, providing enhanced (and more secure) service and benefits to participants, clinic staff, and WIC vendors (grocery stores authorized to accept Arizona WIC benefits).  

The program began moving away from paper benefits back in checks to an electronic system thanks to a $5M grant they received from the USDA in 2014.  It’s basically an electronic system that replaces paper vouchers with a card for food benefit issuance and redemption at authorized WIC grocery stores. Stores in Arizona that participate in WIC services sell about $150M in healthy foods to participants each year.  

WIC is a national nutrition and breastfeeding program that serves low income women, infants, and children and provides nutrition education, breastfeeding information and support, referrals to community services, and healthy foods. The Arizona WIC Program serves more than 160,000 women, infants, and children each month with services provided by 21 local agencies.

Congratulations to Celia Nabor and her entire team, including the folks in I.T. that made EBT transfer a reality.  From now on all current and future WIC members (and vendors of course) will benefit from the team’s work. Accomplishments like this are the things that make public service jobs so rewarding.

 

ADHS’ Opioid Surveillance Rulemaking

The ADHS initiated a rulemaking last week for opioid surveillance and reporting requirements. The draft rules are based on the emergency rules currently in effect.  They plan to host some meetings to solicit input on the draft rules prior to proposing formal rules. They’re also accepting comments through their online portal.